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Auth a Rep form for Deceased Client

Client passed away in the fall and I did last year’s taxes for her Grandson who was POA. He will also be acting as Executor.

Do I need a new Auth a Rep Form? What other pitfalls should I be aware of? No real property to dispose of, only personal assets etc. Which are in the will?

Thank you

Its a whole new engagement, from scratch.
Whole new ball game.
An executor is named and evidenced by a (probated) Will.
Evaluate all evidence carefully.
Get all instructions in writing, from proven authorized persons.

Your reference to a new AuthRep form suggests she may have been a client before passing? If so, any existing AuthRep authorization continues.

It doesn’t “continue”, as much as it is not “automatically cancelled” anymore.

This facility is ony a temporary convenience recently implemented by cra to ease information flow during a transition period.
However, it has no underlying legal basis
The accountant should get new engagement documentation executed before acting.
The accountant also needs copies of the relevant Willl, death certificate etc, as does cra.

She was a previous client, via POA on file.
Does Will need to be probated prior to a new Auth a Rep from Executor and final return?

Different views and suggestions,all good. I will be reviewing T4011

You do not have that client anymore.
Unfortunately and sadly, they are deceased, gone.
Like the “Norwegian Blue”, they are an ex-client.
(Dead Parrot sketch - Wikipedia)
(Dead Parrot Sketch (the original) - YouTube)

Any POA that you have on file for this ex-client has been cancelled on DOD.

For your acceptance of a new client, you should have all protocols in place as to verifying their identity (required), and hard evidence of any purported legal authorities they are asserting they may have.

It may be that you would want to work with relevant parties, such as estate lawyer, additional parties etc, that the verified (proven) executor may hire.

Are you going to be hired as estate accountant? Estate tax preparer? For Final T1s? For T3s? The executor would need to arrange all that.

Although in the real world, people (other than lawyers) sometimes take shortcuts, every shortcut carries problematic risks…

Not every Will gets probated, but that is the “gold standard”, being the evidence of the Court being satisfied as to the validity.

This is my first final return.

Fortunately it is the grandmother of my step children of which one was the POA and now Executor. Whether it is family or not I want to make sure they and I are doing things properly.

Thank you

AS @gcctax stated - if she was a client for whom you previously held authorization, that authorization “should” continue as far as CRA goes (they still sometimes cancel them). From a technical perspective, as @joe.justjoe1 points out, a POA terminates on death, and, while CRA extends the term of the previous authorization as a convenience to us, you need to be dealing with a person who has legal authority to act. That person would be the Executor. They may well be one and the same, but the distinction is nonetheless there - they are wearing different hats - first as POA, second as Executor.

You should obtain a revised Auth from the Executor once convinced that they have legal authority to act. At some point you will also need to file the Will and the Death Cert with CRA as well.

The laws of the province in which the deceased lived will determine whether Probate is required. In BC, for instance, if the deceased owned Real Property, had cash/investments > $30K (generally - varies) Probate is required. Sometimes the Bank requires it for smaller amounts, sometimes not. For Real Property it doesn’t matter - Probate is required. Cars - depends on the mood of ICBC at the time. So - check with your provincial authorities. If the deceased has a lawyer handling the Estate, they will provide guidance.